Worth Reading:

An interesting article in a series: N. T. Wright answers “What makes a good biblical scholar or theologian?” 

This quote struck me as especially relevant as a scholar-practitioner of worship.

But to a Christian studying all this I would say: your personal reading of scripture (especially the Psalms), your prayer, your participation in the church’s rhythm of sacramental worship on the one hand and service to the poor (in whatever form) on the other – all this will form you as a person, including (but going beyond) who you are as a thinking person, in ways you won’t see at the time and perhaps not ever. But it will create and sustain a life in which your historical and theological study will be informed and infused with the life of the Holy Spirit; not to make you a perfect or infallible theologian or historian but to guide you in many appropriate directions and, not least, to give you courage when attempting difficult tasks and consolation when you fail (as we all do), as well as humility on the odd occasions you might really succeed.

Being formed and shaped in the image of God is a primary goal of Christian life. While in seminary, I was frequently reminded not to let my study of God overshadow or replace my relationship with God. In ministry, working for God easily substitutes with spending intentional time in the presence of God. My commitment has been to a daily devotional time as my day begins. That practice has expanded, and I believe, is the most sustaining aspect of my ministry and my life.

How do you integrate the pursuit of knowledge with faith formation?

Advent Daily Devotional


PEACE AND GRACE TO YOU!

Advent is a season to reflect, remember and anticipate. During this time, we remember the coming of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. We anticipate the time when He will come again. And, we reflect on the meaning of His coming, past and future, in our lives.

The Advent Calendar begins four Sundays before Christmas, which falls on November 27 this year. Our focus text for the season is the First Letter of John. The call to discipleship is a call to growing deeper in Christ and like Christ. Therefore, “all who have this hope in Him purify themselves.” In other words, the writer emphasizes that the hope we find in Christ should manifest itself in how we live our lives in relation to God and to one another. The gospel is lived. We not only “tell it on the mountain,” we show it in the workplace, the grocery store, and in rush hour traffic. That is a challenging task for all of us, but it is made immeasurably easier when we begin each day devoting it and ourselves to the Lord. In truth, that is the only way we can purify ourselves – by relying on God to do the work in us and having a receptive heart and spirit.

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